Now that you are a junior in high school, you are getting closer to graduation. Make sure you stay on track for college with your course selection by taking classes such as:

  • English composition II
  • Calculus
  • Physics
  • European history
  • Geography
  • Foreign language
  • Government
  • Civics
  • Economics
  • Art

Meet with your guidance counselor to:

  • Inquire about dual-credit courses that may be offered at your high school.
  • Ask about A+ scholarship requirements, if you are attending an A+ high school. It is a good idea to plan to meet these requirements even if you are not sure whether you want to go on to postsecondary education after high school.
  • Discuss college options and admissions requirements.
  • Continue to explore career paths, your interests, and your strengths.

Your junior year is also a good time to:

  • Join the MDHE's Journey to College discussions at www.facebook.com/journeytocollege.
  • Start/continue your college search. Request information and admissions applications for the schools that are of most interest to you. Be sure to review any special admissions requirements and ask about financial aid deadlines and processes. Discuss college expenses with your family.
  • Attend college fairs and other college preparation events. To search for events in your area, use the Show-Me to College events calendar provided by the Missouri Association of Student Financial Aid Personnel.
  • Visit college campuses and talk to students.
  • Create a resume.
  • Consider people whom you can ask for recommendation letters, such as teachers, counselors, employers, etc.
  • Investigate the availability of financial aid from federal, state, local, and private sources. Request an information package from the Missouri Department of Higher Education. You may also wish to call the Student Aid Hotline at the U.S. Department of Education [(800)-4FED-AID] for a student guide to federal financial aid.
  • If you are interested in military service, begin talking to recruiters.
  • Learn about AmeriCorps, (800) 942-2677.
  • Investigate the availability of scholarships provided by organizations such as corporations, labor unions, professional associations, religious organizations, community groups, and credit unions.
  • If applicable, look for directories of scholarships for women, minorities, and disabled students.
  • Register for and take the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT)/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test(PSAT/NMSQT) to gain knowledge that will assist you when it comes time to take the SAT I and II.
  • Register for and take the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), the ACT test, or any other exams required for admission to college and, in some instances, for eligibility for scholarships - such as Missouri's Bright Flight Scholarship - and other student financial aid programs. If you have difficulty paying the registration fee, see your career/guidance counselor about a possible fee waiver for the tests.
  • Stay active in extracurricular activities.
  • Get a summer job or internship and save the money earned for college.
  • Open a checking and savings account if you have not done so already, and start to build good credit.